Deranged attorney Lisa Riniker gets a pass

Lisa-Riniker

Child-sex-obsessed District Attorney Lisa Riniker

A judge has, for now, dismissed two aggrieved parents’ lawsuit, on behalf of their child, against deranged Grant County DA Lisa Riniker, citing “malicious prosecution and constitutional rights violations.”

The judge conceded, however, that the bizarre actions of the defendants — not only DA Riniker, but also social worker Jan Moravits and Sargeant James Kopp — were “not necessarily appropriate.”

“It seems to make little sense to prosecute a 6-year-old boy for sexual misconduct,” the judge wrote.

Yeah. You could say that. But more to the point, you could also agree with the parents that such a ridiculous–and heinous–prosecution of a child does indeed amount to malicious prosecution and constitutional rights violations.

Full story below the fold.

Judge again dismisses suit by parents of boy, 6, accused of sex assault

http://host.madison.com/news/local/crime_and_courts/judge-again-dismisses-suit-by-parents-of-boy-accused-of/article_32bfea30-ddbe-11e1-8a64-0019bb2963f4.html

August 03, 2012
ED TRELEVEN | Wisconsin State Journal
A federal judge again dismissed a lawsuit filed by the parents of a 6-year-old Grant County boy who was accused of sexually assaulting a 5-year-old girl while playing doctor with her.

U.S. District Judge Barbara Crabb had dismissed the parents’ complaint in April but allowed the boy’s parents to amend the lawsuit to “save their claims with additional allegations.”

But Crabb wrote Friday that the new allegations made by the boy’s parents, which include claims for malicious prosecution and constitutional rights violations, “are no stronger than the claims in their original complaint.”

This time, Crabb dismissed all of the claims made under federal law and said some claims made under state law could be pursued in state court.

However, she wrote, the actions of the defendants in the case — Grant County District Attorney Lisa Riniker, social worker Jan Moravits and retired sheriff’s Sgt. James Kopp — were not necessarily appropriate.

“It seems to make little sense to prosecute a 6-year-old boy for sexual misconduct,” Crabb wrote. If the allegations made by the boy’s parents are true, she wrote, “they suggest an exercise of poor judgment at best.”

But federal civil rights law doesn’t create an action for bad decisions, only for clear violations of constitutional rights, so the case must be dismissed, Crabb wrote.

The case against the boy, who was too young to even be charged as a juvenile, was dismissed in January after he received services to change inappropriate behavior.